Category Archives: Weird Fiction

Romantic Comedy

Romance satisfies our deepest imaginative desire. If we fear loss of identity in separation from what we hold dearest and from what makes us what we are, romance allays those fears. As we imagine narratives of separation and loss, we … Continue reading

Posted in Essay, Weird Fiction

Sonnet, Plus A Note

Almost thirty-three thousand letters, covering a span of sixty years have been found. And were available for consideration in this book. Only two letters were found, for the period 1897 to 1906. Fourteen letters addressed from his father (out of … Continue reading

Posted in Anne, My poetry, Poem Form, Poem of the day, Weird Fiction

Raymond Chandler: The Voice of the Mystery Writer

A good story cannot be derived, it can only be distilled…. And it must have a knight, a reluctant and ambiguous knight engaged in an obscure quest for a grail whose value he can never completely articulate. Chandler is a … Continue reading

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The Year We Left Home

You didn’t give up wanting things because life had put them out of reach. From her earliest stories until The Year We Left Home, Ryan’s fiction has grappled with political and social issues of our age: race, gender, war and its … Continue reading

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Against Interpretation: New View of Dramatic Form

I wrote for a small literary magazine. I was astonished to discover that two weeks later what I’d written became an article in a New York magazine. Susan Sontag Happenings What goes on in Happenings merely follows Artaud’s prescription for spectacle … Continue reading

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The Certificate

Often compared with F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Last Tycoon, this satire on the Hollywood dream factory is a portrait of an artist. The subjects in the painting form the focus of the novel, that takes place on the marginalized side of … Continue reading

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Christmas in Connecticut

    In may seem ironic that Wharton turned to an impoverished town in rural New England for the setting of her most enduring fiction, Edith Frome. It was originally written in French as a language exercise, and in the … Continue reading

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